DIY Phone Case (Under $3)

DIYPhoneCaseicon

Step 1. Purchase a clear case to fit your phone model. They are available for $2 all over Amazon.com. Can’t beat that. One case will work for multiple designs though, so you only need one.

DIYPhoneCase7

Step 2. Find an image you like and print. Here, you can use trial and error to print the size you like or to save ink I opened the image I wanted in adobe reader as a pdf. There you can see the image in the exact size on screen as it will print on paper. I held my clear case to the screen until the size was what I wanted.

DIYPhoneCase2

Step 3: Lay case over the image, as you want it to look on the phone and trace around it. Cut the image out by cutting ever so slightly INSIDE the trace line.

Step 4: Carefully put image into case. You may have to cut away very small edges at a time to adjust to case. You do want some of the paper to fold over the phone edge though so precision isn’t a big deal. Once on, use a box cutter or x-acto knife to cut out the camera slot. (Do this with the paper side up. It is much easier that way)

Step 5: Put it on your phone! Voila! You can change it as often as you want. Use photos of family, let your kids draw on pre-cut phone templates, use a pic from a magazine, anything paper!

DIYPhoneCase1

(((I made two thus the difference in finished product and tutorial pics. I decided I wanted more Belle and more colors after I finished the first one.)))

Advertisements

Beginner’s Cross Body Hip Bag Tutorial

While looking For a project to use my “cute ugly” fabric on, I decided I not only wanted but needed a shoulder bag for running in and out with my kids. I currently tote a big ole back pack full of everything I could possible need to survive a nuclear attack.

Problem was, I couldn’t find anything but pdf patterns, usually at a steep price also. My printer is currently on deaths door which means pdf is out of the question. So I looked at a few pictures and decided to wing it. I have outlines every detail and I assure you this is a beginner project! I am a beginner myself.

Cross-carry bag

You need: 1/2 yard Main Fabric

1/2 yard lining/complementing fabric

1/3 yard fusible interfacing

2 med-large metal rings

2 small metal rings (optional for adjustable strap)

THATS ONE YARD OF FABRIC!!! Hells yeah!

No pattern needed, just the following square and rectangle cuts:

Main Fabric

(2) 10″x 12″

(2) 12″x 3.5″

(2) 3.5″x 8″

(1) 10″x 10″

(1) 10″x 6.5″

(1) 10″x 3.5″

Lining Fabric

(2) 10″x 12″

(2) 12″x 3.5″

(2) 3.5″x 8″

(1) 10″x 10″

(1) 10″x 8.5″

(1) 10″ x 3.5″

Interfacing

(2) 10″x 12″

(1) 10″x 10″

I use old newspapers to draw and cut my squares and rectangles to use as patterns, much easier than retracing every shape.

Keep ALL scraps!!!

Should look something like this.

Satchel Tutorial

Firstly attach your fusible interfacing to the 10″x 10″ and both 12″x 10″ pieces of lining fabric

lining

 Round the corners of both your 10″x 10″ squares like so…

20150204_220845

You can do this by putting them together then folding in half. If you are not confident in your free cut, trace a cup or lid to get a perfect rounded guide line.

20150204_220913

Now, place both pieces right sides together. Sew along both sides and around curved ends, leaving the straight side opposite your curved edged open. snip notches into the curve of the fabric to prevent bunching. Be careful not to cut your seam.

20150204_235012

Flip right side out, press, and sew a 1/4″ seam along the edge. Should look similar this when finished. Set aside for now.

20150204_235304

20150204_235310

Using both the 10″x 6.5″ main fabric and the 10″x 8.5″ lining fabric, fold one of the longest edges down 1/4″ and press. Turn again 1/4″ and press again creating a concealed edge. Sew along this edge to create the finished edge of your pockets.

(I used pockets 2″ shorter than what is suggested here, Mine were a tad more shallow than I had hoped for originally)

20150204_221603

Now stack your pockets onto you front right side of your panel (10″x 12″), the way you wish for them to be seen from the outside, hemmed sides on top. (Note: your pockets should look slightly taller. I added 2″ to this tutorial)

20150204_222128

Using your two 12″x 3.5″ Lining fabrics, place and pin them right sides together onto both sides of your front panel.

20150204_222150

Sew along the 12″ edges straight down, being sure to sew over the pocket edges also. Open and press open seam.

20150204_222551

using your 10″x 3.5″ Lining piece, place and pin it right sides together across the bottom front panel, Just like the two pieces before. Sew across, being sure to sew through the bottom of the pockets also. Open and press seam.

20150204_222919

Here it gets tricky. You are going to sew together the ends of the lining pieces to form a corner. I wish there were a better way to show you but really, just line them up, straight raw edge to straight raw edge.

20150204_223255

20150204_223337

When both are done should look something like…

20150204_223355

Now, grab all your pins. Use the remaining 12″ x10″ main fabric piece and begin to pin it to all the lining fabric sides on the back (right sides together), creating a bag. Start at bottom corners for best results.

20150204_231635

Sew, press, and flip right side out. To save you time and frustration later, press the top raw edges down about 1/2″, do not sew them yet though.

20150204_232441

20150204_232449

Repeat all these step (without pockets) to create your lining. When finished you should have 2 complimenting bag shapes. Fold and press raw edge of lining bag 1/2″ also. Do not sew.

20150204_234430

Locate your flap piece with the rounded corners. Now pin your flap to the back inside of your outer shell about 1/2″. Raw edge should be folded down so from the outside there will be no raw edge visible. Sew.

20150204_235635

Flip your lining bag inside out and insert into outer bag, so you have right sides visible looking in and out, set aside.

Using your 3.”x 8″ pieces, lay complimenting fabrics right sides together. Stitch completely down both long sides, flip right side out and press. Here is one sewn and one flipped right side out. You should have 2 when complete. These will be your hooks for your metal rings.

20150205_001149

loop each piece around one of your metal rings. Sandwich the ends in between the lining and outer shell of your bag along your 3″ sides, inserting ends at least 1″-2″ into the seam. Pin

20150205_001905

Continue pinning around the entire mouth of bag. With raw edges folded under. Sew a 1/4″ seam around the entire top. Be sure to sew a few extra stitches on both sides with the metal rings. They will be weight bearing seams so reinforce them.

20150205_001959

When finished should look something like…

20150205_002817

Now for straps. I did not manage to get pictures but there are several way to do this. I cut all my remaining scraps into 3″ strips. I then sewed them all together in a continuous strip, being sure to reinforce each seam with a zig-zag stitch. After I had one long strip of fabric (1.5 yards) I folded my strip in half, right sides together, and sewed straight down.

Then using a safety pin, fed one end through the looong tube pulling it right side out. Press.

You could also use one continuous strip of fabric if you have it, or use nylon strapping.

To attach to your metal rings you have 2 options. One being the most simple, by choosing a set strap length and sewing it directly around the loop on both sides. Be sure to fold your raw edge under.

MbC1

To make an adjustable strap, FIRST attach one end of the strap to your 2 smaller rings

MbC2

Then loop your raw end thru one big ring and into the smaller rings much like a belt. Pull all the way to the opposite larger ring and sew like in first drawing above. you should have double strap on one side like so…

20150205_134100

Attached to larger rings like so…

20150205_134107

Once That’s done, ENJOY YOUR BAG!

20150205_134807

Note: You can add snaps or velcro. I didn’t have any handy for this project but I prefer the flip and grab. My current bag has a magnetic snap and I want to chunk it every time I try to snap it while wrestling kids though a parking lot.. Like looking for a contact in a blizzard. Will probably go with velcro if I make another though.

Easier, Cheaper, Quicker Photo to Canvas Transfer

I have seen lots and lots and lots of photo to canvas transfers. The majority of these transfers call for a gel medium which runs about $13…. NOPE! It also calls for 12 hours of drying. “Ain’t nobody got time for dat”

So here is my version that was muuuch cheaper! It also makes creating a more vivid picture easier without as much peeling and tearing.

Supplies:

Printed image from laser jet printer

Canvas to fit printed image

White acrylic paint

Modge Podge

Olive or vegetable oil.

Blow Dryer (optional)

Cost:

To print $0.10

Paint $0.30

Modge Podge $0.10

Vegetable oil $0.05

Canvas $1.00 (9 pack for $9)

Total: $1.55 per canvas photo

Now here is how you do it!

1454753_670002496355069_1262572445_n

Step 1: Print you image. Be sure to flip it the opposite of how you want it to look as you will be transferring it face down. Paint your entire canvas with one good coat of white acrylic paint. Be sure to paint the entire surface. Allow to dry. You can use a blow dryer to speed up this process or it will dry on it’s own within 15-30 minutes depending on how thick the paint is.

1453267_670002436355075_175558186_n

Step 2: Cover entire surface in modge podge.

1469915_670002383021747_485661876_n

Step 3: Place photo face down onto canvas and smooth out all bubbles. Try to create as little wrinkles and bubbles as possible. Allow to dry. This can be sped up with a blow dryer also. Without a dryer allow 20-40 minutes to dry.

(This is a great project to work on while cleaning the house or preparing supper)

1459669_670002323021753_472413233_n

Step 4: Spray the now dried paper with water. This works best if you work in sections instead of soaking the entire canvas. I used a spritz bottle with water. You can also use a wet sponge or wet rag….

1470152_670002286355090_970270388_n 1470128_670002019688450_553861191_n

…Begin rubbing with your finger. layers of paper will start to peel away. Be very careful in this process. Peel one layer at a time away. It will look vivid when wet but as the water dries it will look more white again. I will show you how to fix that.

The more layers you remove the more vivid the photo becomes but on the same hand the more layers you remove the more apt it is to tear and leave a hole in the photo. So one or 2 layers is plenty! Don’t over do your rubbing!

1463921_670001933021792_1640355862_n

Once completely peeled it will still have a hazy white over it, let it dry, only takes a few minutes or use the blow dryer. Then use a dry rag or paint brush to brush off loose pieces of paper lint.

1450748_670001663021819_340179466_n

Step 5: Grab that vegetable or olive oil….

1471152_670001643021821_1254199467_n

… pour onto canvas and use a soft cloth or brush to spread the oil over the canvas.

1477457_670001609688491_1938556085_n

the oil will soak into the paper and make the colors stand out much like the water did. Only the oil will not dry up! Allow the oil about 1-2 minutes to saturate the thin layer of paper.

1466212_670001556355163_140893697_n

Step 6: After oil has had a couple minutes to saturate go over the entire canvas with modge podge. The modge podge will mix with the oil but don’t worry. It will still dry and the oil will still stay within the paper/canvas.

You can use a paint brush to create paint strokes in the modge podge for a faux painting if you wish.

Then allow 30-40 minutes to dry. The surface my still have a slight greasy feeling after it dries but I have had my others on the walls for a few months and they are completely dry and touchable.

I have not hung This one yet but here is his sisters photo’s. A couple of them transferred so flawlessly I had to purposely rip pieces away for the raw look I was going for.

1463976_670001433021842_1638851899_n

I painted the edges of the canvases after transferring but that is a personal choice. Completely optional.

So there you have a easier way to create these beautiful pieces of art!

 

Copper Top Penny Coffee Table DIY

This table…(shakes head) … this table, it belonged to my husband’s Nana which translates into, “We are never getting rid of it” I’ve had tried numerous time to get a new coffee table and have been met with a “No” from Jerry. It was a regular brown coffee table when we got together. I thought it had met it’s demise a few years back when my husband and a friend crashed into it. Wrong!, Jerry screwed it right back together. So, since we can’t let it go, at least we can make it more unique.

coffeetable

All you need for this project is:

a Surface (coffee table in this case)

Elmer’s Pro bond advanced or equivalent, must bond metal to wood

Martha Stewart Copper Metallic Glaze or equivalent, an acrylic copper will work as well.

Black spray paint your choice of gloss or flat

Polyurethane clear gloss

Pennies, pennies, pennies!!! 

Just to go ahead and warn you, you are going to need more pennies than you think. I chose this project because I assumed “Oh! pennies! how cheap this will be!” After my first visit to the bank for $5 in pennies I discovered I was wrong. In all, I estimate $15 in pennies. Not my cup of tea AT ALL!!!

This project in all including paint, pennies, and polyurethane I estimate at around $25. Still cheaper than a new table. I was given the Martha Stewart paint by my sister so FREE! Already had the Elmer’s on hand as well.

933979_621025961252723_1580269495_n 1016136_621025944586058_988103384_n

This is what we started with. I painted the table a sherbet orange a year or so ago. This was after a slight sanding.

548355_621026001252719_1006849231_n

Step 1: Paint entire piece your base color; I chose black. Let dry

d6ab7863-55b7-4232-82f8-5ba8e285eb20_300

Step 2: using you glaze or equivalent, cover whatever surface your placing your pennies. This will make it look like a more cohesive piece. The gaps in between will not stand out as much. Also if your working with an odd shape like I was, this will make your edges look much more uniform.

1097999_621026061252713_1334203752_n 1237880_621026024586050_578979066_n

I used an old blush brush to make swirly patterns. Almost left it like this; was very pretty. I just wanted some texture in my life though, so I continued.

1236276_621026087919377_1898837237_n

Step 3: using the Elmer’s advanced bond start placing your pennies in a stagger pattern for maximum coverage. If you are working with a odd shape, like this table, it will be your call on how far to let pennies overhang. Some rows will line up perfectly with the edge while others will have a gap or leave your penny hanging over. Totally up to you what you do with it. This is the reason I applied the copper. The copper base makes these edge gaps less noticeable.

532096_621026181252701_380148038_n

My completely filled table. 15 stinking dollars later! Don’t fret, Gluing them down is much quicker than you think, even a little fun.

1149076_621026204586032_1776176744_n

Step 4: You want to apply this for numerous reasons. It will protect the pennies from turning colors, avoid them coming off the table from wear, and seal the cracks for easy cleaning. To apply, literally pour the contents of the can into the center of the table. Using a wide paint brush or sponge, work the coat outward to the edges. You may need more or less to completely fill the cracks for a smooth surface area. For a very smooth finish, buy 2 cans. Repeat this step again after table had completely dried with second can of polyurethane.

This will take anywhere from 24-48 hours to dry. I left mine outside for the first 36 hours. The nearly drowning humidity kept it from drying completely so I had to confine it to a bedroom away from toddler hands overnight to finish the drying process. Seriously though, the humidity here is so bad you almost need scuba gear to breathe in the yard.

1151033_621026271252692_1332657164_n

Step 5: Enjoy table! Mine will get an extra coat of polyurethane I’m sure eventually. I LOVE the wet look it gives it!

14137_621026311252688_1971559887_n

Isn’t it lovely?

1240583_621026231252696_1154744203_n

Paxton saw the camera and waned to “cheese” for Mama.

BONUS!!!

598480_621026347919351_1098027257_n

Add pennies in any pattern to a cheap piece of dollar store glass. I think they sell them for candle stands. Got this one for $0.25. It’s a new coaster for my fancy table.

Enjoy!

DIY American Flag Shorts

I recently got a deal on red white and blue Sperry style loafers. They cost me $8 which is still a little more than I like to spend on shoes. So I now have the obligation to make sure I have as many things to wear with them as possible. Got to get that $8 out of them… yes… I… am….that…CHEAP! So I decided to repeat a DIY I tried for the 4th of July. I got so many compliments on my shorts! So I  made a second pair, (technically a third, my first pair ended up being 2 sizes to small.) My pride was tarnished but I soldiered on with a larger pair.

Let me start by saying, American flag shorts have made a come back therefore they are expensive! I don’t like to spend more than $5 on shorts or $10 on jeans, so buying a pair was out of the question.

I pulled out a pair of shorts from the closet. Chances are, since the brand in the tutorial are American Eagle, that my friend gave them to me after she got knocked up. Love when friends get fat or skinny because I’m right in the middle; I get new clothes!!! Now to the how to…

shortcollage

I’m saying $5.00 but technically I already had all the supplies. FREEEEE!!!! I’m estimating $5 for the following supplies

Supplies: Red and White acrylic paint, paint brushes, pair of old shorts, (optional: chalk or white paint pen)

CB804CF9-orig_zpsffd1cde1

Step 1: Lay shorts flat. Starting at center seam paint a red line straight across to side seam. If you are not confident in your straight line skills you can mark it off with tape. As your paint dries it will darken. I personally think it looks more rugged, but if you’re looking for a bright pop of red, I would recommend going over each line again after they dry.

E477C5BE-orig_zpsfca6d4dc

Step 2: Fill the spaces in between with white paint. Pocket lining and waist band are completely optional. The orientation of your stripes are also completely optional.

2C5ED72D-orig_zpscd761f56

Step 3: To put on the stars you have a few options. a) freehand them on with paint and brush. b) using chalk or paint pen, draw on stars then fill in with paint. c) purchase a star stamp from hobby store. I personally found it easy to just draw a five point star using a paint pen (it goes on very faint) When they where placed where I wanted, I painted them in using white paint.

BE17FC18-orig_zps80f342c8

Step 4: Repeat on the back. Getting into the crotch area will be tricky. You will have to hold you hand in the crotch and maneuver you lines around. Another style for the back I have seen is just painting the pockets stars and stripes. Up to you!

How to Care for your Shorts

I made another pair that where washed using regular washing powders and dried in my dryer several times with the rest of the laundry. That pair did fade but colors did not run.  They have that really rugged look, like the ones pictured in the collage for $70.  If you want to keep them as bright as possible you can try sealing with an acrylic sealer though it may cause extra stiffness. For washing, turn inside out. Wash on light cycle using a Tbsp of  baking soda. Baking soda will clean the shorts from regular wear without harsh chemicals that are in usual detergents. Lie flat to dry. For an in between bright and rugged look try washing like you would anything else then using the baking soda method.

Hope you give it a try and enjoy your new patriotic shorts!

DIY Old Book Dresser Makeover

Been a minute since I have posted. Been a pretty busy couple months. My computer had to spend some time in the shop as it was ATE UP with viruses. I haven’t been doing many projects but I have quite a few in the works and finally completed one last night. So I present you now with

Easy Dresser Makeover

873D949A_zps522fc694

First let me start by saying, This is the second makeover this particular dresser has went through. I don’t have a picture of  it originally but the below photo is as close as I could find to its original state via Google

Suite8DrawerDresser_thumb[1]

It looked a lot like this. Even had a mirror. That mirror has since been removed, repainted, and hung on the wall.

The dresser went through its first makeover for the girls room a couple yeas ago. It looked fabulous, wish I could find a photo 😦 It still looked great before this project but I’m moving the dresser to our room and pink zebra and fashion magazine modge podge just wouldn’t cut it. After stripping off all I could this is what I ended up with.

9E10E9F8-orig_zpsd2d699e6

We had painted the dresser black already before the last makeover so we got to skip that step this go round.

Supplies: Modge Podge, Old book, Black acrylic paint, Brown acrylic paint (optional), box cutter or exacto knife,  Paint to paint your piece whatever color you choose.

Project cost me around $8 if I include acrylic paint and modge podge. Our local book store always has FREE books bins outside, YAY!!! So the book was even free!  The dresser was given to us a few years back FREE

Step 1: Remove Hardware (handles and knobs) then paint entire visible surface whatever color you choose. I actually used black spray paint when I redid it for the girls the first time. Was able to spot paint a few scratches using my black acrylic this go around.

step 2: Tear your book apart. I find it easier to remove the spine and cover. The pages will be much easier to peel away with minimal fraying.

29AEB84C-orig_zpsa4edf6d1

Step 3: Modge Podge paper onto each drawer. In my impatience I did not have actual modge podge. I used a elmers glue and water mix… I would not suggest that method as I had to go back and do a LOT of touch up gluing. Should have just went to the damn store for modge podge. Do not worry about over hang right now, we’ll get to that.

BD809AE3-orig_zps1422ef35

Notice the bubble? Modge podge will help to avoid these and create a much cleaner look. I did not like the straight edge look so I tore paper randomly into rough edged shaped and covered part of the blank margin area.

3A68476D-orig_zpscc9126cd

Step 4: You may like the slightly off white color. I wanted a more aged look however. Using the brown acrylic mix it with equal parts water. It will make a really runny brown stain (that sounded gross!). Brush this mix onto each drawer. I would suggest layering it as it tends to lighten as it dries.

8D93193F-orig_zpsd02c783d

See the difference? The white was pretty but just not quite right for our bedroom.

Step 5: Once everything had dried, trim the edges of your excess paper using a box cutter or Exacto knife. Wait till all glue or stain is COMPLETELY dry. It will slice right off without tearing this way. As you are doing this check your edges and be sure they are securely glued to the drawer. constant sliding will cause any unattached pieces to began to tear over time.

You may want to seal it with a extra layer of modge podge once it is all done to completely seal all your pages together.

Step 6: Put it all back together. Pick a design or free hand a design onto drawers. Think of drawers as one complete piece.

FEF0533B_zps6bbefebcC30259A8_zps348696b7

Here is each side of mine. I free handed a simple swirly line then just began adding elements to it. I originally wanted to do a deer silhouette but the spacing between drawers would have made it look deformed.

Last step: reattach all your hardware. (This dresser has been through the ringer so I will actually have to replace most the knobs) I was in such a hurry to get this posted though I’m showing it pre-new-knob. Don’t judge me!

873D949A_zps522fc694

VOILA!!!! One of a kind Dresser!

Check out this beautiful dresser upcycle from Suburban Musing http://kathi.wordpress.com/2013/05/23/chalk-painting-an-awesome-vintage-dresser/

A Month of Toddler clothes in ONE Drawer!

I don’t hang my toddler’s clothes… ooooh how dare I?! I hate children’s hangers and I hate hanging clothes. He’s a toddler; I don’t think he cares if he has a wrinkle or 2 or 7. The only things we hang are bulky items such as coats, sweaters, hoodies, and dress or special occasion clothes. This does cause a clutter in the storage of other clothes but I have found a system I love and is pretty easy to stick to.

I saw a post at the dawn of Pinterest that suggested packing infant clothes in zip-lock bags when traveling. I thought “Hmm.. pretty simple yet effective, but how about all the time?” ABSO-FREAKING-LUTELY!!! The husband can no longer say “but I cant put together outfits like you” when asked to dress the kid. They are all preplanned. Storage is sooooo easy because entire outfits will no longer take up nearly as much space.

Supplies: Box of SLIDER gallon zip-lock storage bags. That’s it!

Note: I usually slack on this in winter as pants and winter clothes are more bulky and a pain in the tit. PERFECT for summer however.

PicMonkey Collage

All this in one dresser drawer! You can even switch to shelf storing with this easy trick.

20130522_122438

Start by trying to gather all you child’s clothes that they actually wear, wash them, and have all together.

Set aside about an hour, give or take depending on how much clothes your child has, to do this. It’s actually kind of fun and once you get it done the first time it will be a snap to keep it going.

20130522_115726 - Copy

Start by sorting clothes accordingly. I like to separate mine into shorts, collared shirts, and t-shirts. If you have a daughter you may want to do dresses, shirts, skirts, leggings/stocking. I do not like to do pants because of the bulk so I usually store them all together to just grab whenever I need a pair. Here in Louisiana summer we won’t be needing them anytime soon.

20130522_121030

Start sorting into outfits. You will most likely have a LOT more shirts than shorts so I usually pair one collared shirt and one or 2 t-shirts with each pair of shorts. Kids are messy and having a backup shirt is always nice. This is also like having more than one outfit in one bag, saving space! Once you have all your outfits together get ready to bag

Note: I always end up with a couple of extra t-shirts that don’t match anything; these become sleep and play shirts.

20130522_121114

One pair of shorts & 2 shirts.

20130522_121229

Try to put into bag as flat as possible. This usually mean only folding shorts over once. Use slider bags because they make this step so much easier. Close bag leaving about a 3″ gap open and squeeze out excess air. Once you have done about 8 or 9 bags, stack them on one another, each being slightly opened, then sit on em or squish them. This will push out even more air making them even smaller to store. After pushing out air seal bag.

20130522_122437

Voila!

If you have a bow wearing daughter you can include bows that are exclusive to a certain outfit into it’s bag so you always have it together. You can also add socks to the bags so you always have a pair handy when getting your little one dressed.

The Math: I ended up with 17 bags. 14 of these bags had 2 or more shirt options in them. (We’ll say they all had 2 for maths sake) That’s 31 outfits in  a 7″x19″ space. Can’t beat that. Nothing better than walking into your child’s room and grabbing a bag and having an instant outfit with backup clothes to throw in the diaper bag. Even better when we’re going away for a few days. I grab a handful and throw them in the suitcase and he’s set.

To keep this up, keep a box of zip-lock bags in the drawer with their clothes or where-ever you sort laundry.

Hope this was helpful. I promise you this is super easy. I am…well… I wouldn’t call it lazy so much as “unmotivated” and even I keep this up.

Upcycle Old Windows

Old windows have made a real come back, only not on your house, but in it. People are picking these things up like the latest diet craze. Lucky lucky me I have an aunt who generously gave me a few while remodeling a house. Here is what I did.

Looking Glass Painting.

20130513_223144

These windows had a mossy like film over the glass that really made it looked age to I cleaned only the backside of the glass.

20130506_135716

Using looking Glass paint, paint the BACK of the window. This type of paint looks dull from the side you paint but shiny and reflective on the opposite side.

20130506_135751  20130506_140433

This is the back side of the window where the paint was applied

Because I kept the front side of my window filmy it doesn’t look AS mirror like but instead a little more aged. If you are using a regular or clean window they will appear more mirrored.

20130513_223122

To get the image, allow paint to dry on back. Simply use acrylic paints to paint design on the front. If you are not confident in free hand you can use a dry erase marker to get it right or place a picture behind the glass BEFORE you use the Looking Glass spray paint and trace onto the front.

20130513_223112

Make husband hang it. DONE! Total cost: $12.00 (Looking Glass Paint)

I used acrylic on the front of the glass, instead of applying it on back side before Glass paint. This was because acrylic is easy to wash off so I can change the quote or image as often as I choose. Great for Christmas time or if I change my room decor.

BONUS: An Easy Window Idea

20130514_115406

Old book pages behind glass then mount! Easier than talking smack about that girl you hated in high school!

This project cost a total of $0.00

$5 Cork board Art DIY

I needed to find a way to tie my desk makeover into the decor of my living room, so here was the easy and functional fix!

20130511_171633

Cork Board Decor!

20130511_163116

Supplies: Cork Board ($5 at Wal-Mart for 4 squares, mounting tape included), Fabric, Modge Podge (not pictured), Glue OR Stapler, scissors

It shows glue in the photo but I ended up using a stapler to avoid the drying process, I will explain both ways.

20130511_163258

STEP1: Cut out a square of fabric to fit your cork leaving a few inches of over hang. This is the same left over fabric from the desk I re-did. I only bought a yard and a half of the stuff for like $7 and still have enough left for at least 2 more project! ALWAYS keep your scraps!

20130511_16352220130511_163550

STEP2: Cut your fabric and lay cork on top, fold over your corners and staple like so. Be sure fabric is tightly pulled. IF YOU ARE GLUING… put a strip of glue down the side and fold over tightly, lay a heavy book on top of edge till dry. You can instead also secure with paper clips, chip bag clips, bobby pins, hair clips, etc.

20130511_16364120130511_163631

STEP3. A completed square should look like so. Back and Front. Now repeat with a second square the same way.

20130511_164520

STEP4: Cut out designs from the same fabric, if you are using a fabric that is not a print you may just want to cut out shapes or designs of your own choosing. Here I cut out different shapes from the print.

20130511_165202

STEP5: Modge Podge designs onto the 2 uncovered cork boards.

  20130511_171653

Now hang using the adhesive squares included (if you bought from wal-mart). There are a ton of different ways to hang them, great for odd spaces or small walls and completely functional! These are hanging by the desk with matching fabric, pulls it all together great. The cork matches my burlap curtains awesome as well!

Thanks!

Super Simple Super Cheap Glass Desk Make-Over

So, I have the most boring computer desk. I must admit it looked pretty sleek and clean when I picked it out 4 years ago. Now its just looks plain and lost in my eclectic style living room. So here is a cheap and easy fix! Toddler safe!

PicMonkey Collage

How-To

20130505_144320

Supplies: 1 yd fabric (for this size desk),  Modge Podge, Spray Paint

(note: I used gloss Modge Podge, I would suggest a matte, as the gloss left slight streak marks on fabric)

20130505_174205

Step one: Spray paint metal work. You may prefer to leave the metal whatever in color, but silver just did not match what I had in mind. If your fortunate enough you can catch your husband on an off day and convince him to do this, lucky me… today.

I chose a galvanized spray paint as I’m lazy and HATE sanding. This way if it bubbled it would only add to the effect. Turned out great!

20130505_172230

Step 2: Lay your glass surface piece on fabric and trace pattern. You want it as accurate as possible to avoid annoying trimming later.

20130505_172625

Step 3: Cut out shape you just traced. Easy enough

20130505_173013

Step 4: Cover UNDERSIDE of your glass with modge podge

20130505_173219

Step 5: Lay your fabric FACE DOWN onto glass. When complete your fabric will be displayed from underneath the glass for easy cleaning. Like I said, toddler proof. Be sure to smooth out all wrinkles and bubbles in fabric.

20130505_173952

Step 6: Go over the fabric with another coat of modge podge. Be sure to go around edges to make sure it’s completely glued down. This step helps to find bubbles and secures the fabric to the glass a little better.

Repeat steps 2-6 on other glass surface and let dry. Trim excess edges that may over hang glass.

NOW PUT IT BACK TOGETHER!!!

20130505_191456 20130505_191509 20130505_191822 20130505_191812

Paxton insisted on adding his car to the picture. Love that kid.

Feel free to comment and share! Love me some Pinterest!